Health experts hope viral chart makes you think twice before grabbing a soda

Chart of what happens to your body on coke/ therenegadepharmacist.com
Chart of what happens to your body on Coke / therenegadepharmacist.com

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — This diagram has been making its way all across social media from Instagram to Facebook, but did it catch your attention?

“I didn’t really read it because Coca Cola isn’t something I drink. I don’t drink soda,” said Liz Smith, who saw the picture as she scrolled through Facebook.

“Um, you know I never feel too good drinking soda,” said Maria Medina, who drinks soda about once a week.

While the chart shows a tight time frame, experts say you may want to read the facts.

“Over the past 30 or 40 years, soda consumption has skyrocketed and along with that, so has overweight and obesity, in particular in children,” said David Egerdahl, a registered dietitian at Memorial Hospital.

The chart shows what happens to your body after a drink of soda, from a high dose of sugar, to the nutrients you lose out on, and a sugar crash.

“It doesn’t surprise me, it just reiterates why I don’t drink soda,” Smith said.

The chart goes on to say how a can of soda can increase your dopamine levels, the same way heroin works.

“Whenever you try a new food, and it’s pleasant, your body does have that response. However, the more you try it, the more blatant it becomes. Your body gets used to it. With soda, your body never gets used to it. It continues to have that response,” Egerdahl said.

“I’m glad I’m not drinking sodas,” said Beth Bretton, who doesn’t include soda in her diet.

Bottom line, drinking soda can be detrimental to your health.

“Soda’s not my favorite drink, it’s not,” Medina said.

Health experts said it’s best to not drink soda at all, but they hope people who see the picture think twice before reaching for a can.

The chart shows one can of Coca Cola has 10 teaspoons of sugar, which experts say is about 45 grams of sugar – the recommended daily sugar limit for women by the American Heart Association.

For men, the AHA recommends no more than 65 grams.

While the chart does have a picture of a Coca Cola can, experts say it goes for all caffeinated and sugared beverages, like energy drinks.

For those wanting to cut back on soda, Egerdahl recommends starting by only drinking them with meals.

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